HR Nugget – Tips in How to Select the Right Candidate for the Role

The single most important decision for managers is selecting the right employee for the right job. Selecting the right employee doesn’t just happen; it takes preparation, thought and work.
Recruiting can often be a hard and drawn out process and choosing the ideal candidate for a position in your company can often be a challenging process.

Taking the time to make sure the right employee is in the job has a direct effect on business performance and staff turn around.

Here are some tips to guide you through the process of finding the right candidate for your vacancy:

1. Have a clear view of the specific job. Ask yourself some key questions such as:

  • What skills are you looking for?
  • What experience is required?
  • What do you think the skills required will be in a year from now?

2. Good interviewing is about being focussed, listening and verifying your thoughts. Study and write out questions specifically aimed at uncovering the presence of those characteristics for the ideal fit to the role – competency based interviews or CBI’s are becoming a common route to determining such attributes.

3. Start the interview with less demanding questions and build up to the more pressured ones.  This helps put the candidate at ease and allows you to ask more probing questions later.

4. Move past what’s on paper and don’t let a glowing CV lower your guard. Just because a candidate has the experience to set them apart from other applicants doesn’t necessarily mean they have the on the job skills.

5. It is helpful to have a second opinion. Have a member of your team sit in on the interview. Very often they may have picked up on something you have not.

6. Follow up on supplied references. This is often brushed aside however it is an important step. Star candidates have been known to supply references of previous employers who have fired them!!

7. Listen to your instincts. As people we feel certain chemistry in any new relationship and this new “manager/employee” relationship is also subject to those gut instincts.

8. Consider company culture. While it is important to find a candidate who fits perfectly into a position it is equally important they fit the culture of the company. Your candidates are living, breathing people – focus on getting to know them in more ways than one.

9. Finally remember the candidate may not be applying to your role exclusively – If the right candidate comes along do not procrastinate and offer them the role.

 

How to deal with a Grievance that is received when you are also dealing with an unrelated Disciplinary matter

Question: What do you do where you receive a grievance during disciplinary proceedings? The matters are not related in substance. The allegations are serious enough where gross dismissal is a possible outcome. If allegations are found to be such that warrant summary dismissal, would you still investigate grievance? And would you do so during the disciplinary proceedings or after?

Answer:  There is no straight forward answer.  There are lots of possible combinations. Subject to practicalities, go through both processes in parallel as quickly as possible.  I don’t believe either should be put on hold; that is if the subject matter is unrelated.

If you decide to run the two procedures concurrently it is advisable to have separate Chair / HR.  For many smaller companies this would cause operational strain.  If this is the case, I propose you deal the grievance case after you conclude with the disciplinary and appeal process, and commit to following through on due process.

If a dismissal was enacted before the unrelated grievance, it would still be in your interest to hear the grievance, if the employee still wanted to pursue it, as it may reveal issues internally that need addressing, or at worse some unrelated bullying or harassment.

Where in doubt, call Mary on 086 8225448 to discuss through your situation and get some advice.  All situations are different and need to be handled accordingly.