HR Nugget – Tips in How to Select the Right Candidate for the Role

The single most important decision for managers is selecting the right employee for the right job. Selecting the right employee doesn’t just happen; it takes preparation, thought and work.
Recruiting can often be a hard and drawn out process and choosing the ideal candidate for a position in your company can often be a challenging process.

Taking the time to make sure the right employee is in the job has a direct effect on business performance and staff turn around.

Here are some tips to guide you through the process of finding the right candidate for your vacancy:

1. Have a clear view of the specific job. Ask yourself some key questions such as:

  • What skills are you looking for?
  • What experience is required?
  • What do you think the skills required will be in a year from now?

2. Good interviewing is about being focussed, listening and verifying your thoughts. Study and write out questions specifically aimed at uncovering the presence of those characteristics for the ideal fit to the role – competency based interviews or CBI’s are becoming a common route to determining such attributes.

3. Start the interview with less demanding questions and build up to the more pressured ones.  This helps put the candidate at ease and allows you to ask more probing questions later.

4. Move past what’s on paper and don’t let a glowing CV lower your guard. Just because a candidate has the experience to set them apart from other applicants doesn’t necessarily mean they have the on the job skills.

5. It is helpful to have a second opinion. Have a member of your team sit in on the interview. Very often they may have picked up on something you have not.

6. Follow up on supplied references. This is often brushed aside however it is an important step. Star candidates have been known to supply references of previous employers who have fired them!!

7. Listen to your instincts. As people we feel certain chemistry in any new relationship and this new “manager/employee” relationship is also subject to those gut instincts.

8. Consider company culture. While it is important to find a candidate who fits perfectly into a position it is equally important they fit the culture of the company. Your candidates are living, breathing people – focus on getting to know them in more ways than one.

9. Finally remember the candidate may not be applying to your role exclusively – If the right candidate comes along do not procrastinate and offer them the role.

 

How to deal with a Grievance that is received when you are also dealing with an unrelated Disciplinary matter

Question: What do you do where you receive a grievance during disciplinary proceedings? The matters are not related in substance. The allegations are serious enough where gross dismissal is a possible outcome. If allegations are found to be such that warrant summary dismissal, would you still investigate grievance? And would you do so during the disciplinary proceedings or after?

Answer:  There is no straight forward answer.  There are lots of possible combinations. Subject to practicalities, go through both processes in parallel as quickly as possible.  I don’t believe either should be put on hold; that is if the subject matter is unrelated.

If you decide to run the two procedures concurrently it is advisable to have separate Chair / HR.  For many smaller companies this would cause operational strain.  If this is the case, I propose you deal the grievance case after you conclude with the disciplinary and appeal process, and commit to following through on due process.

If a dismissal was enacted before the unrelated grievance, it would still be in your interest to hear the grievance, if the employee still wanted to pursue it, as it may reveal issues internally that need addressing, or at worse some unrelated bullying or harassment.

Where in doubt, call Mary on 086 8225448 to discuss through your situation and get some advice.  All situations are different and need to be handled accordingly.

HR Nugget – Interviewing Tips

As we are now approaching the New Year, some companies get active in filling those vacant jobs or new jobs.  It is so important to set time aside to conduct the interviews.   Here are a few nuggets:

  • Be on Time!
  • Establish Rapport
  • Put candidate at ease
  • Discuss process – timeframe/skills assessment
  • Position discussion- Identify aspects of the position and how it ties into the organisation. Describe the position – don’t minimize the realities and don’t over sell the job!
  • Obtain information from the candidate- competency based Questions
  • Encourage the applicant to do most of the talking (80/20 rule)
  • Ask the same questions of all applicants for consistency and fairness
  • Avoid asking questions pertaining to Discrimination:, such as -Age, Race or ethnicity, ancestry, birthplace, native language, religion, religious customs or holidays, sex or gender, pregnancy or medical history, family or marital status, childcare arrangements, physical or mental disabilities.

 

Be careful what you ask, remember that asking the wrong questions could be potential liability for your Company.

Illegal Questions – What you can’t ask at Interview!Interview questions and issues you want to avoid include asking improper, even illegal interview questions making discriminatory statements, and making binding contract statements such as:

  • Are you an EU citizen? (adversely impacts national origin)
  • Do you have a visual, speech, or hearing disability?
  • Are you planning to have a family? When?
  • Have you ever filed a workers’ compensation claim?
  • How many days of work did you miss last year due to illness?
  • What off-the-job activities do you participate in?
  • Would you have a problem working with a female partner?
  • Where did you grow up?
  • Do you have children? How old are they?
  • What year did you graduate from school/college? (reveals age)

Final Reminders:

  • It is essential to know discrimination laws.
  • The interviewer should stay focused on the job and it’s requirements, not any preconceived assumptions about what the applicant can or cannot do.
  • Sell the job and the company while keeping your pitch realistic. Unrealistic job expectations will generally lead to employee dissatisfaction
  • Make sure you elicit questions or provide information which will help clear up any unanswered questions or doubts that are lingering in the applicant’s mind.
  • End the interview on a friendly note and, if possible, apprise the candidate of the next step and the time frame for a decision
  • Complete the evaluation form while the interview/s is still fresh in your mind.
  • Make a fair and unbiased recommendations or decision based on the job related qualifications of the applicants.

If you need any more information or support with your Interview process, please contact Mary on 086 8225448

Closures Due To Adverse Weather

We were all impacted by Storm Ophelia recently. It did untold damage to property, caused chaos to the public services and as a result many businesses were forced to close.  Were you prepared!!

The following guidelines may give you a few tips for how to handle the next storm or adverse weather conditions that come our way.

When absences arise because employees are excluded from work in exceptionable circumstances such as adverse weather conditions, such as Red, Orange, or Yellow Status weather warnings, the employer reserves the right to introduce any of the following:

  • Employees take unpaid leave
  • Employees take annual leave
  • Employees work from home
  • Employees are paid for the day

Management should assess each situation on a case by case basis and take into consideration   any health and safety issues with due regard for these special circumstances.

If an employer receives adequate notice regarding such circumstances (adverse weather forecast) an action plan should be put in place and communicated to employees. If it is the decision of the Management to close the office then employees will be advised which option is being applied.

The applied action plan may be dependent on the severity and longevity of the situation that arises. In the event that the situation is short-term management may decide to pay the employee a maximum of <<number >> of days in a rolling year.

However if the employee excludes themselves (business opened and accessible) from work payment may/will not be made.

 Employees should be expected to make reasonable efforts to get into work (for example, using alternative travel arrangements).

If the employee believes that there is a health and safety risk involved they should not travel, but should contact their manager and discuss his /her situation.

Communication is the key.  Employees should be asked to notify their Manager by phone, or by some other means, as soon as possible if they have any problems getting into work and to seek clarification on the situation.

Are your Employees Engaged?

Did you know that a mere 16% of employees in Ireland are actively engaged in their work?

Gallup, a performance management company who published the report on the State of the Global Workplace found that 64% of employees in Ireland are not engaged in their work and the remaining 20% are actively disengaged. In other words, 64% of employees lack motivation and are less likely to invest discretionary effort in the company’s objectives and 20% are unhappy and unproductive at work which means they are liable to spread a negative attitude to their colleagues.

Before you can solve the problem of disengagement, it’s important to understand it and learn how to recognise it.

These are the 10 most important metrics that companies need to keep in mind in order to improve employee engagement.

  • Recognition     When an employee does not receive recognition for a job well done, their desire to continue doing great work will diminish. Be sure to give constant praise, even for the little things.
  • Feedback:      Touch base with your employees frequently to let them know how they’re doing, and give them meaningful feedback on how they can do even better.
  • Happiness:  When your employees are happy at work, they will perform better. This means creating a positive work environment and making sure they feel valued.
  • Personal Growth :  Offer professional development programs to your employees to keep them motivated to grow within the company.
  • Satisfaction:  This accounts for things like workload, office environment, clarity of expectations, salary, benefits, etc. Making sure that your employees are satisfied with their experience at the company will help keep them engaged.
  • Wellness:  Offering a healthy workplace, perks such as gym access, and mental health initiatives like mindfulness programs will help keep stress at bay.
  • Ambassadorship:  Employees who would recommend their company as a place to work are much more likely to do a great job and be actively engaged. Create a positive company culture and a work space that caters to employees needs.
  • Relationship With Managers:  Relationships between employees and managers need to be based on constant communication, mutual trust and respect.
  • Relationship with colleagues:   70% of employees say friends at work is the most crucial element to a happy working life. When colleagues get along well, communication and workflow improve.
  • Company Alignment:   Do your employees’ values align with the mission of the company? It is very important to make sure that your team understands and respects the organisation’s values.

How can Leaders help Employees find Meaning at Work

Organizations spend considerable resources on corporate values and mission statements, but even the most inspiring of these — from Volvo’s commitment to safety to Facebook’s desire to connect people — tend to fade into the background during the daily bustle of the work day.
What workers really need, to feel engaged in and satisfied by their jobs, is an inner sense of purpose. As Deloitte found in a 2016 study, people feel loyal to companies that support their own career and life ambitions — in other words, what’s meaningful to them. And, although that research focused on millennials, in the decade I’ve spent coaching seasoned executives, I’ve found that it’s a common attitude across generations. No matter one’s level, industry or career, we all need to find a personal sense of meaning in what we do.

Leaders and Managers can foster this inner sense of purpose — what matters right now, in each individual’s life and career — with simple conversation. One technique is action identification theory, which states that there are many levels of description for any action. For example, right now I’m writing this article. At a low level, I’m typing words into a keyboard. At a high level, I’m creating better leaders. When leaders walk employees up this ladder, they can help them find meaning in even the most mundane tasks.
Regular check-ins that use five areas of inquiry are another way to help employees explore and call out their inner purpose.

Ask your employees: 

What are you good at doing?

Which work activities require less effort? What do you take on because you believe you’re the best person to do it? What have you gotten noticed for throughout your career? The idea here is to help people identify their strengths and open possibilities from there.

What do you enjoy?

In a typical workweek, what do you look forward to doing? What do you see on your calendar that energizes you? If you could design your job with no restrictions, how would you spend your time? These questions help people find or rediscover what they love about work.

What feels most useful?

Which work outcomes make you most proud? Which of your tasks are most critical to the team or organization? What are the highest priorities for your life and how does your work fit in? This line of inquiry highlights the inherent value of certain work.

What creates a sense of forward momentum?

What are you learning that you’ll use in the future? What do you envision for yourself next? How’s your work today getting you closer to what you want for yourself? The goal here is to show how today’s work helps them advance toward future goals.

How do you relate to others?

Which working partnerships are best for you? What would an office of your favourite people look like? How does your work enhance your family and social connections? These questions encourage people to think about and foster relationships that make work more meaningful.
It’s not easy to guide others toward purpose, but these strategies can help.

Article from Harvard Business Review

Retirement – Dealing with the retirement age challenge

In many countries, there is increasing pressure on employers to put in place more flexible retirement policies. This has been mainly triggered by developments in social policy, increases in state pension age (with the resulting income gap) and the potential shortfalls in occupational pension provision. These factors are leading to a greater number of requests from employees to continue working beyond their contractual retirement age and employers having to respond to these challenges.

It is important that employers review their retirement age policy to ensure that they are well positioned to deal with any challenges from employees and changes in legislation. Any retirement age policy should ideally fit in with:

  • The new statutory framework and age-discrimination legislation
  • The needs of the employer’s business in the areas of career progression, succession planning and productivity
  • Retirement income adequacy for retiring employees taking account of Company and State pensions

Employers often think that employees will have to retire when they reach the defined Normal Retirement Age under their occupational pension scheme. However this is not the case. The majority of pension schemes provide flexibility for benefits to be taken before or after Normal Retirement Age and it is essential to look more broadly at what has been communicated about retirement age within employment contracts and within employment policies that have been implemented in the past.

The new statutory framework introduced in 2016 and case law emanating from Irish courts and tribunals has made it clear that the setting of a compulsory retirement age must be objectively justified by the existence of a legitimate aim and evidence that the means of achieving that aim is appropriate and necessary. One of the consequences of the new law is that if fixed term contracts are offered post retirement, the employer will have to demonstrate evidence of objective justification for the termination of employment at the point of expiry of the fixed term contract.
Where changes are made, particular care needs to be exercised when amending the terms of pension and risk benefit plans including:

  • Reviewing the funding and cost implications of altering retirement age in defined benefit plans
  • Trying to introduce retirement flexibility while still operating within the Revenue Commissioner’s restrictive rules in terms of pension access.
  • Considering how to deal with the potential gap between the company’s retirement age and the new State pension age (which is gradually phasing to age 68).
  • Amending the terms of death and disability plans with insurers to reflect new retirement policies.

Employers should be cautious in how they approach the retirement age issue

There are many pitfalls for employers in trying to deal with retirement age and it can be a very sensitive issue for employees.

Employers need to:

  • Engage with employees as they reach the retirement window and ensure that contracts of employment specify a retirement age
  • Have an “objective justification” for any defined specific retirement age. Reasons which have been accepted by the courts in the past include succession planning, and the promotion of intergenerational fairness
  • Reserve the right to vary and review the retirement age as the needs of the business evolve and develop
  • Be careful in setting precedents where employees are allowed to work beyond a set retirement age (even if it involves offering a fixed term contract). Such practices can make it more difficult for employers to enforce their set retirement age in other cases.

Article provided by Willis Towers Watson

Tips to Consider when Introducing Performance Management

A culture of high standards can only be achieved if the company strategy, goals and objectives are shared throughout the workforce.  The company needs to provide an interactive platform for engagement and alignment for both management and employees.

Let’s look at the basics:

First thing we would recommend is making sure all job descriptions are fit for purpose and relevant for the job. Depending on the size of your organisation, line or departmental managers will play a vital role in instilling a culture of high performance throughout your organisation. Here are a few tips that we would recommend to get your company ready for performance reviews and goal setting for the rest of the year.

  • Do you currently have a policy in place in relation to performance management? If not this is something we recommend you look at. The policy should demonstrate the company’s commitment to a high performance environment throughout.
  • Set goals and targets for the company, then each department/team and then for individual staff members. By including each team member in the goal setting task this will get everyone thinking about what they want to achieve not only in terms of the company but also on a personal level. If people have a personal interest they are more likely to work harder to achieve the goals.
  • Have continuous meetings. Organisations are moving away from, what some have referred to as the bureaucratic annual performance reviews and are having weekly or monthly catch ups to make sure everyone is still working towards the same goal. We think this is a god idea and it ensures there are no surprises for either party.
    • Don’t just focus on under performers, your star players will need to be incentivised and motivated as much as an underperformer………

Having continuous and regular performance meetings with all employees is essential for the growth and sustainability of a company. By having clear targets and goals set in advance of the year ahead you will keep everyone working towards the same goals.

If you would like any support or further advice on managing performance Contact Right Hand HR and Mary will be available to support you.

Contracts without Specific Working Hours (Zero-Hours Contracts)

Do you know what a zero-hours contract is?

A zero hours contract of employment is a type of employment contract where the employee is available for work but does not have specified hours of work. If you have a zero-hours contract this means there is a formal arrangement that you are required to be available for a certain number of hours per week, or when required, or a combination of both. Employees on zero-hours contracts are protected by the Organisation of Working Time Act 1997 but this does not apply to casual employment.

The Act requires that an employee under a zero-hours contract who works less than 25% of their hours in any week should be compensated. The level of compensation depends on whether the employee got any work or none at all. If the employee got no work, then the compensation should be either for 25% of the possible available hours or for 15 hours, whichever is less. If the employee got some work, they should be compensated to bring them up to 25% of the possible available.

If you use these type of contracts ensure you are being fair to your employee!!

For more information, contract mary on 086 8225448

Ireland’s National Workplace Wellbeing Day, 31st March17

The Benefits of Workplace Wellbeing

Did you know that the European Network for Workplace Health Promotion has defined workplace health promotion as the ”combined efforts of employers, employees and society to improve the health and well-being of people at work”?

According to the World Health Organisation, there are many benefits of workforce health promotion to the employee and the organisation.

Benefits of Workforce Health Promotion

To the organisation To the employee
A well managed health and safety programme A safe and healthy work environment
A positive and caring image Enhanced self-esteem
Improved staff morale Reduced stress
Reduced staff turnover Improved morale
Reduced absenteeism Increased job satisfaction
Increased productivity Increased skills for health protection
Reduced health care/insurance costs Improved health
Reduced risk of fines and litigation Improved sense of well-being

Large and small companies across the country are encouraged to participate in Ireland’s National Workplace Wellbeing Day, which is on 31st March2017.  The event aims to improve employee health through promoting better nutrition and physical activity. Click on the link to find out how your company can get involved:  http://www.who.int/occupational_health/topics/workplace/en/index1.html