HR Nugget – Getting a Job is Hard Work

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Getting a Job is Hard Work

Getting a Job is Hard Work Many people who apply for jobs but don’t get them assume there was some external force acting against them; they think the interviewer didn’t like them, or that they were over-qualified. That may be true in some cases, but more often than not it’s down to one of the following 4 pitfalls that are so easy to avoid.

1. Your CV needs work Over 90% of CVs are not up to scratch. Too wordy, too boring, too untidy, or just too many errors. People can still get jobs with poor CVs, but why not make it world class? All the resources to do this are at your disposal. You can ask for as much help as possible, but it takes time, hard work and application. If I could give you one piece of advice, above and beyond having no spelling mistakes, it would be to tell them what you do well rather than just what you do. As the reader of a CV, all I need to know is if you are good, not how much you’ve done.

2. You need to do the work Sending a CV to a company or a recruitment agency saying: “here is my CV, can you find me a job?” just will not work. If you are not directly applying for a specific job, your CV could easily get lost in the crowd. Know what you want to do; if you don’t, get career guidance before you look for a job. Apply for specific jobs relevant to what you want and then follow up with a phone call. No one can work harder in getting you a job than you. Own as much of the process as you can. On top of this, realise that over 50% of jobs are not advertised so network with friends and colleagues to try and hear about opportunities.

3. No interview preparation Most people don’t like interviews but that is no excuse for not practicing. Have you mastered anything without planning and practice? Most of the questions can be predicted – ‘talk me through your cv’, ‘what are your strengths and weaknesses?’, ‘how would others describe you?’, ‘why do you want to work here?’, ‘do you have any questions for us?’. Prepare, not just to yourself but in front of a mirror, or recording yourself on your phone. Practice helps enormously, but most people don’t want to put in the time and effort.

4. Attitude and enthusiasm We all like enthusiastic people, we are even more likely to forgive them more and give them a second chance. Companies also love people who come across as motivated and enthusiastic about the job. No matter how you feel at the beginning of the day, make sure you go into the interview with a positive frame of mind. You would be amazed how quickly you can do this. For some people it can be thinking of a great memory, a son or daughter, or a picture they have on their wall. For others it’s exercise or a beach walk – but do whatever you need to do to ensure that when you walk into that room you are at your best.

Getting a job is hard work. Put in the time and effort and do everything you can to get that job, no matter what gets in your way. If you need help, contact Mary

HR Nugget – Tips in How to Select the Right Candidate for the Role

Every month we will send you a useful nugget of information that takes only two – three minutes to read. At the bottom of this page, you can share this subscription with others or unsubscribe yourself. We hope you enjoy our HR Nuggets and find them useful.

The single most important decision for managers is selecting the right employee for the right job. Selecting the right employee doesn’t just happen; it takes preparation, thought and work.
Recruiting can often be a hard and drawn out process and choosing the ideal candidate for a position in your company can often be a challenging process.

Taking the time to make sure the right employee is in the job has a direct effect on business performance and staff turn around.

Here are some tips to guide you through the process of finding the right candidate for your vacancy:

  1. Have a clear view of the specific job.
  2. Good interviewing is about being focussed, listening and verifying your thoughts. Study and write out questions specifically aimed at uncovering the presence of those characteristics for the ideal fit to the role – competency based interviews or CBI’s are becoming a common route to determining such attributes.
  3. Start the interview with less demanding questions and build up to the more pressured ones.  This helps put the candidate at ease and allows you to ask more probing questions later.
  4. Move past what’s on paper and don’t let a glowing CV lower your guard. Just because a candidate has the experience to set them apart from other applicants doesn’t necessarily mean they have the on the job skills.
  5. It is helpful to have a second opinion. Have a member of your team sit in on the interview. Very often they may have picked up on something you have not.
  6. Follow up on supplied references. This is often brushed aside however it is an important step. Star candidates have been known to supply references of previous employers who have fired them!!
  7. Listen to your instincts. As people we feel a certain chemistry in any new relationship and this new “manager/employee” relationship is also subject to those gut instincts.
  8. Consider company culture. While it is important to find a candidate who fits perfectly into a position it is equally important they fit the culture of the company. Your candidates are living, breathing people – focus on getting to know them in more ways than one.
  9. Finally remember the candidate may not be applying to your role exclusively – If the right candidate comes along do not procrastinate and offer them the role.

How can you Champion Innovation in the Workplace?

HR Nugget – April 2014

Every month we will send you a useful nugget of information that takes only two – three minutes to read. At the bottom of this page, you can share this subscription with others or unsubscribe yourself. We hope you enjoy our HR Nuggets and find them useful.

How can you Champion Innovation in the Workplace?

Give the gift of time:

Time is what we never seem to have enough of, but we could do worse that to give staff back this precious commodity.  If we are always racing to get things done, we are not going to be able to hear ourselves think and then we miss those golden nuggets that can come to us when we are not expecting them.  Google have given their employees up to 20% of work time to come up with these innovative ideas, which reportedly led to Gmail.  Other companies offer employees up to two weeks off to pursue projects outside of their normal work responsibilities.

Lose the clean desk policy:

Create the environment to get those creative juices flowing.  Google leads the way in this by creating creativity rooms/space and by setting aside that clean desk policy.  A recent study last year at the University of Minnesota, found an independent panel,  judged ideas derived from peoples cluttered workstations more “interesting and worthy of development” than those that came about then people had been grouped together in an empty room to brainstorm.

 Get close to customers:

Listen to what your customers are saying. Customers are paying for a service and often tell you what they like and don’t like.  Be open to listening to your customers and capture the ideas that come along.  Smart supermarkets made a note of what customers requested so that they could capture potential trends and so were ahead of their competitors. Harley Davidson cite an example of where they listened to what the customers wanted and implemented the ideas saving up to three years on the design of the bikes and sales rose by 15.5%.

 Make Innovation pay:

Innovations hates structure, but HR can help it by embedding and communicating reward and recognition programmes to encourage bright ideas. There are lots of examples for schemes that work and encourage innovation. Not all ideas put forward will be profitable for the company; however reward those employees where their ideas are used.

The very best HR programmes will encourage innovative ideas from staff, by offering them a profit share on those implemented. Don’t miss out on opportunities to hear what your staff has to say….we can often miss those new bright ideas.

Capture the best ideas:

The company website is a great place to allow staff to post ideas, comment on ideas and make suggestions. Another way is to see how things are at the coalface, and mix with employees and often great ideas come out of this.

Source; People Management February 2014

 

 

Benefits of Mentoring

Benefits of Mentoring  – New Employees

Research has revealed up to 25% of new HR hires are lost within the first 12 months.  One of the key findings of the research was that the integration of new hires is often unsuccessful. Hiring costs is very expensive and depending on the role could cost an organisation up to 30% of the new recruits 1st year’s salary.  That is why an external mentoring scheme would help candidates during their first 100 days as this would ensure that the   candidates don’t feel abandoned in their new roles.

The mentor and mentee get together to forge a relationship that can last much longer that the critical 1st 100 days in the new position.

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What are the benefits for the mentors and mentees?

Mentors from outside the organisation are able to offer neutral feedback and enable someone to appreciate situations from another point of view. For a mentee, it’s someone to share your challenges with and bounce ideas off. Equally, the mentor can be independent and ask frank questions about the scenarios you’re faced with. As a mentor, it’s rewarding to share the experiences of another person and see them develop and grow. Learning, professional growth and personal development all dovetail with what the HR profession is all about.

With the right mentor the mentee can really benefit in terms of acting as a sounding board outside the mentee’s current organisation, guiding the individual in his/her professional development and supporting the individual to really become a champion into the organisation. It  works well for people who are new to a job or position and need some guidance to find their way more quickly and painlessly, e.g. A mentor might make some introductions to key people or resources, and guide their mentee onto the right track.

Right Hand HR in conjunction with DPR Associates offers a tried and proven mentoring programme and would be happy to talk to you about this.

 

HR Nugget – Dealing with Sickness Absence

Every month we will send you a useful nugget of information that takes only two – three minutes to read. We hope you enjoy our HR Nuggets and find them useful.

 Dealing with Sickness Absence

Sick leave costs Irish employees hundreds of thousands of euro each year.  The cost is not only financial costs, but also the disruption to the business and the amount of management time consumed on managing sick leave is significant.

In this month’s Nugget Right Hand HR give you a number of top tips for dealing with sickness absence.  These include:

  • Have a written sickness policy – Documentation is very important and is the first thing an employer should refer to as this ensures all employees are dealt with in a fair and systematic manner.  If you do not have a policy right Hand HR can support you with this.
  • Keep in touch with employee during sick leave – The employer still has obligations to employee while on sick leave.
  •  Obtain regular updates on the employee’s medical condition.
  • Keep records – this is crucial.  Make a note of when you contacted the employee and what the employee told you.
  • Conduct return to work interviews – these can be informal but ensure in all cases that the policy is applied consistently to all employees.  This does not mean that common sense cannot be applied.
  • Don’t terminate unless you have engaged.

Make sure you have the facts
Make sure the employee is aware that you are considering termination
Give the employee a chance to respond to any decision the company may be taking.

There is lots of evidence of case law where employees have successful won cases they have taken against their employer.  The key for the employer is that the Sick Leave Policy is applied consistently and that the employees are aware of the policy.   Employees can take a case under many of the Acts such as the Disability Act.

If you want more information please contact Mary.

 

Workplace Mediation Tips

HR Nugget  –  February  2014
Every month we will send you a useful nugget of information that takes only two – three minutes to read. At the bottom of this page, you can share this subscription with others or unsubscribe yourself. We hope you enjoy our HR Nuggets and find them useful.

 Workplace Mediation Tips

Workplace mediation is becoming more widely used as a means for resolving conflict.  Mediation provides an opportunity for those involved to address the issues, explore options and reach a workable outcome through a mutually agreeable course of action.

The advantage of using workplace mediation is that it allows a problem to be resolved informally, by ensuring that all sides are heard.  The process also means that participants are involved in finding an agreed solution as they work together to solve the problem.

Conflict in any organisation can do enormous damage. Mistakenly, disputes are often left to fester and thereby become more difficult to resolve.

Here are some tips for workplaces to boost the chances of a successful mediation:

  •  Address situations early, as unresolved conflict is highly damaging for businesses
  •  Give a clear outline of how the mediation will work so parties understand their role
  •  Meditations can take several days so allow time and space for the mediation to work If  decisions need to be made, involve someone with the authority to make them
  • Engage external support early if needed, to reduce the toll on all workers
  • Don’t rush the process; the pre-meetings/interviews are just as critical as the mediation itself
  • Make sure all parties understand the need for confidentiality

I recommend you only use the mediation process with a qualified mediator, which Right Hand HR can offer.  If you want more information please contact Mary.

 

HR Nugget – Training – Mentoring – Coaching – What is the difference?

HR Nugget  –  January 2014

Every month we will send you a useful nugget of information that takes only two – three minutes to read. At the bottom of this page, you can share this subscription with others or unsubscribe yourself. We hope you enjoy our HR Nuggets and find them useful.

Training – Mentoring – Coaching – What is the difference? 

Interview

Simply put, the main difference is in how directive the method is.

Training tells people what to do, it’s a “Here’s how you do it” approach that works well for technical things and hard skills, where there is literally only one right way of doing it, e.g. you follow steps 1 – 24 exactly to assemble the machine or it won’t work!

Mentoring guides and advises, it’s a “Have you tried this way?” approach that works well for people who are new to a job or position and need some guidance to find their way more quickly and painlessly, e.g. A mentor might make some introductions to key people or resources, guide their mentee onto the right track.

Coaching empowers by asking the right questions, it’s a “You know the solution” approach that works well for soft skills and confidence building, where personality plays a big role and what works for one person might not work for another, e.g. a coach might enable the coachee to see things from different perspectives and thus find a solution.

Coaching needs to be done by a professional who has a background in executive coaching, proper training and years of experience, whereas training and mentoring can be done by senior employees for their juniors after a basic “train the trainer” or “introduction to mentoring skills” workshop (we can offer these for you).

If you want more information please contact Mary or Diarmuid.

Right Hand HR in conjunction with DPR Associates  offers a unique approach to coaching.  We address employee engagement and leadership issues and offer training programmes to suit your needs.